Plastic Arts

“Corporate Memphis”: Why do all websites look the same?

18 August, 2021 · Plastic Arts

Illustration created for this article with an online service using the "Corporate Memphis" variant made famous by the American magazine "Jacobin".
Illustration created for this article with an online service using the "Corporate Memphis" variant made famous by the American magazine "Jacobin".

We have all encountered dozens of magazines, stories, websites and commercial applications with an aesthetic similar to that of the illustration adorning this article. That style is known as “Alegria” or “Corporate Memphis.” It is a product of the precarization and devaluation of labor and has dozens of variants and versions, all equally lifeless and repetitive. But there is more to the homogenization of graphic representation than bad news dressed up in false corporate optimism.

Christo

1 June, 2020 · Plastic Arts

His absolute emptiness, his use of monstrous scales as a way of attracting capital, his pecuniary greed – only comparable in impudence to Dalí – his total, absolute and voluntary renunciation of signifying the slightest contribution to those who contemplate his works, is in itself a faithful, hyper-realistic even, portrait of the spirit of the ruling classes of his time. Classes of which he was a part from his birth. That is why Christo is a paradox. It’s not art, no. But its essence is so sterile and dead that it represents like few others the anti-human, anti-historical character of the system in our times. Bunting or tarp cover included.